OUTDOOR ADVENTURE

in Rim Country, White Mountains of Arizona & Beyond...

Hole in One

By: Brian Zongker, PGA

 

One of the ultimate achievements in a golfer’s life is to score a hole in one. It doesn’t really matter how good you are or how long you’ve been playing, whether you will admit it or not, deep down every golfer wants to make an ace. A hole-in-one, by definition, is when a ball is hit from a tee shot and ends up in the cup, thus awarding the player the score of 1 for the hole.

 

So how common is a hole-in-one? Well, certainly skill plays a factor. For the pro golfer, the odds are approximately 3000 to 1; a low handicap player is 5,000 to one and, for the average golfer, the odds are 12,000 to one. Basically, there is skill in the ability to hit the ball far enough and accurately enough to reach and to get on a green in one shot but it’s pure luck that it goes in the hole. Some lucky players have had multiple aces while many, perhaps most, golfers will never have one at all. Holes-in-one do not discriminate by age. Jack Paine made a hole-in-one at 3 years old while Elise McLean scored an ace at 102. Tiger Woods’ first hole-in-one came at 6 and Michelle Wie made hers at 12.

 

Each hole-in-one has a story. My first ace came when I was in my early teens and happened to be one of the ugliest shots of all time. I basically got up on the second hole at Los Alamos Golf Course, took a mighty swing, looked up and sculled the ball about 150 yards into the hole. The ball never got more than a couple of inches off the ground but somehow managed to find the green and roll into the cup. Fortunately, the score card does not have enough room to write all that information down and I just put a 1 with a circle... READ MORE...

Appreciation

By Brian Zongker, PGA, NSP

There are so many good things in life that we seem to ignore or take for granted. We get caught up in daily routines, problems, work and the general stress of our situations so that we often overlook what is truly important. Certainly, this varies from person to person. What stresses me out may cause someone else to thrive and vice versa. Figuring out what is important to you is truly the key.

 

Living in the White Mountains we can easily get caught up in the negative and overlook the positive. Here’s an example: When it snows, you may think about having to shovel the driveway or how it will take you longer to get to work. You may worry about how to keep your house warm or the wood for the fireplace dry. We tend to forget about the beauty of the freshly fallen snow ...

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Under the Influence

By Brian Zongker,

PGA Life Member

 

    Golf is like a drug and you can get hooked on it. You have heard me talk before about the power that the game can have over us. How it can dominate your thoughts, cause you to be in a bad mood or a good mood. It affects the way we as golfers think sometimes, obsessing on this shot or that shot, or I could have done this better or that, or if I just hadn’t missed that putt, if I could have just kept it in bounds. There are a multitude of different ways that golf can affect your life in both positive and negative ways. It can build you up and tear you down. It can save your life or it can ruin your marriage.

    But that is not the influence that I am talking about. You see golf gave me a life and a career. To this day, I love to play and I hope I will be able to play all the way up until the time I die. So why did I begin this walk with golf? What, or who, influenced me to play the game, compete competitively and turn it into a career and a life? Well, many things and many people, I suppose. First and foremost, my Dad. My Dad essentially taught me the game. He inspired me to play and to get better. He always told me that I could be as good as I wanted to be. My local PGA Professionals had a major influence on my game and my life as well. Often acting as second fathers. I called them my golf Dads. They helped shape my game but, more importantly, they taught me the Business of Golf. Everything from selling range balls to teaching Juniors to  Read More...

Why Do We Get So Mad?

ByBrian H. Zongker,

PGA Life Member

 

    Some of my proudest moments have been on the golf course. Some of the moments that I am most ashamed of have been on the golf course as well. If any of you know me, I think you would be surprised to hear that I have a hot temper. That’s because it rarely shows unless I am on the golf course or working on a home improvement project. I mean how many times do you have to go back and forth to the hardware store to fix a toilet? I start going to different stores just so that the sales people stop recognizing me. Sorry, back to golf. Those of you who have golfed with me have probably seen the other side. The side of me that I am not so proud of…even ashamed of.

    So why do we (yes, we…I know I’m not the only one), get so angry when we are playing golf? Why is it that the game that seems so simple makes us so frustrated? I mean, really, all you have to do is hit the little ball into the hole. Simple, right? No, not really. Golf is perhaps the hardest game ever invented. The funny thing is that the persons who invented it had no idea what they were getting into…getting us golfers into. It is certainly the hardest game that I have ever played. We practice in an attempt to improve and move ever so slightly up to mastering the game. We hit some good shots. We make a few good scores. We shoot a few good rounds. Then, in a blink of an eye, it’s like we never held a club in our hands at all. A missed putt, a ball out of bounds, a drive in the trees, a double bogey. Right back to where we started.

    You see, humans hate making mistakes. It’s frustrating…even maddening. Golf is a game of minimizing mistakes. No shot is perfect and no round is perfect. Just because

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